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August 23, 2018   •   David Mytton

What is HumanOps

 
 

A practical guide to HumanOps - what it is and how to get started

Humans are a critical part of operating systems at scale, yet we rarely pay much attention to them. Most of the time, energy, and investment goes into picking the right technologies, the right hardware, the right APIs. But what about the people actually building and scaling those systems? The main principle of HumanOps is to provide a framework for focusing on the human side of infrastructure.

In 2016, Server Density launched HumanOps. It started with an event in London to hear from some of the big names in tech about how they think about the teams running infrastructure.

How can you reach your high availability goals without a team that is able to build reliable systems, and respond when things go wrong? How does sleep and fatigue affect system uptime? System errors are tracked, but what about human error? Can it be measured, and mitigated?

With the acquisition of Server Density by StackPath, I am pleased that HumanOps now has a team dedicated to continuing to build the community. We're open to anyone taking on responsibility for a local meetup but will also be running our own series of events in major cities around the world. The first of these kicked off last week in San Francisco.

What is HumanOps

The problem

A superhero culture exists within technical systems operations.

Being woken up to fix problems, losing sleep to make an amazing fix live in production, and then powering through a full day of work is considered to be heroic effort.

There is little consideration for the impact this approach has on health, family, and long-term well-being.

The aim

Running complex systems is difficult and there will sometimes be incidents that require heroic effort. But these should be rare, and there should be processes in place to minimize their occurrence, mitigating the effects when they do happen.

HumanOps is about encouraging teams to consider new ideas and implement best practices around how to look after the team members who look after your systems.

It considers that the human aspects of designing high availability systems are just as important as the selection of technologies and architecture choices.

It's about showing that mature businesses can't afford to sacrifice their teams and how the best managed organizations achieve this.

If Etsy, Facebook, Spotify and the UK Government can do this, so can you.

How to implement HumanOps

The first step to implementing HumanOps is to understand and accept the key principles.

Key principles

  1. Humans build & operate systems that have critical business impact.
  2. Humans require downtime. They get tired, get stressed, and need breaks.
  3. As a result, human wellbeing directly impacts system operations.
  4. As a result, human wellbeing has a direct impact on critical business systems.

HumanOps systems and processes follow from these principles.

HumanOps systems & processes

There are many areas of operations where HumanOps can be applied, but there are a few core areas which are worth starting with first. Each one of these could be a separate blog post, but here are a series of questions to start thinking about your own process design.

On call
This is where the most impact occurs. Being woken up to deal with a critical incident has a high impact, so it is important to design the on-call processes properly. Some key questions to ask: how is the workload shared across team members? How often is someone on-call and how long do they get off-call? What are the response time expectations for people at different escalation levels (e.g. do you have to stay at home by your computer or can you go out but with a longer response time?). Do you get time off after responding to an incident overnight? If so, is there any pressure to forgo that e.g. it should be automatic rather than requiring an active request. Do managers follow the same rules and set an example? Do you expect engineers to support their own code? Do you consider additional compensation for each on-call incident or is it baked into their standard employment contract? Do you prioritize bugs that wake people up?

Metrics
You can't improve something without measuring it. Critical out-of-hours incidents will happen, but they should be rare. Do you know your baseline alert level and whether that is improving? Do you have metrics about the number of alerts in general, number of alerts out of hours? Do you know if one person is dealing with a disproportionate number of alerts? Do you know which parts of the system are generating the most alerts? How long does it take for you to respond and then resolve incidents? How does this link to the business impact - revenue, user engagement, NPS? Are these metrics surfaced to the management team?

Documentation
Only the smallest systems can be understood by a single person. This means writing and keeping documentation up to date needs to be a standard part of the development process. Runbooks should be linked to alerts to provide guidance on what alerts mean and how to debug them. Checklists must form a part of all human performed tasks to mitigate the risk of human error. How do you know when documentation is out of date? Who takes responsibility for updating it? How often do you test?

Alerts
Most system operators know the pain of receiving too many alerts which are irrelevant and don't contain enough information to resolve the problem. This is where linked documentation comes in, but the goal should be that alerts don't reach humans except as a last resort. Interrupting a human should only happen if only a human can resolve the problem. This means automating as much as possible and triggering alerts based on user-impacting system conditions, not just on component failures where the system can continue to operate. Are your alerts actionable? Do they contain enough information for the recipient to know what to do next? Are they specific enough to point to the failure without resulting in a flood if there is a major outage?

Simulation
A large part of the stress of incidents is the uncertainty of the situation coupled with the knowledge that it is business / revenue impacting. Truly novel outages do happen but much of the incident response process can be trained. Knowing what you and each of your team members need to do, and when, will streamline response processes. Emergency response teams do this regularly because they know major incidents are complex and difficult to coordinate ad-hoc. Everyone needs to know their role and what to do in advance. War gaming scenarios to test all your systems, people, and documentation helps to reveal weaknesses that can be solved when it doesn't matter as much and teach the team that they can apply haste without speed. How is the incident initially triaged? What are the escalation processes? How does stakeholder communication work? What happens if your tools are down too e.g. is your Slack war room hosted in the same AWS region as your core infrastructure?

What's the point of spending all that time and money on fancy equipment if the people who actually operate it aren't being looked after? Human wellbeing is not just a fluffy buzzword - it makes business sense too.

What are HumanOps events

The idea behind HumanOps events is to share what works and what doesn’t, and to demonstrate that the best companies consider their human teams to be just as important as their high-tech infrastructure.

Over the coming months I'll be writing more about each of these topics and sharing the videos of other organizations explaining how they do it, too.

If you're interested in attending, speaking, or even running a HumanOps event near you, check out the website event listings and get in touch if there's nothing nearby.

   
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